Advertising component of marketing plan

research, planning, public relations, pricing, customer support, advertising are all components of Marketing
research, planning, public relations, pricing, customer support, advertising are all components of Marketing
research, planning, public relations, pricing, customer support, advertising are all components of Marketing

Here’s a great example of a marketing mix whereby components  of research, planning, public relations, pricing, customer support, sales strategy and community involvement form a cohesive plan.  The mix percentage will be different for each business, but be sure to include all the components. Thanks to Tish Pierce, Pierce Creative Marketing Service.

Archeologists have found evidence of advertising in every civilization that communicated by writing. As soon as one man grew or raised too many of what he needed, the concept of bartering was born. To extend the barter beyond a chance encounter, posting in a public place of what was available or what was wanted became commonplace. This “poster” method of advertising dominated for many years.

As posting of goods and services became more commonplace, competition for the viewer’s eye grew. The embellishment of elements or services offered was hired out to artists. Remember Toulouse-Lautrec? His famous posters lured customers to the Moulin Rouge.

From the simple poster, advertising has grown with the mass media. Communication in this day and age is seen everywhere, usually in split seconds. Regardless of the speed of the advertising vehicle, it remains the same as it has for the past hundred years. Advertising is salesmanship functioning in the paid space and time of mass media.

The salesman of every company has one primary duty: persuasion. Just as a good salesman reflects the standards of his or her company, an ad should convey the personality of the advertiser. Throw a little reason and logic into the equation and your advertising will always be on point.

Now that we know how advertising evolved, how is it different from marketing? Believe it or not there is a definite delineation. Advertising the action of calling something to the attention of the public especially by paid announcements. It is a paid, public, non-personal announcement of a persuasive message. Marketing is the process or technique of promoting, selling, and distributing a product or service. It includes the systematic planning, implementation and control of a mix of business activities intended to bring together buyers and sellers for the transfer of products.

Break it down this way: if Advertising is a piece of okra, then Marketing would be the gumbo. Advertising is a single component of the marketing process. The whole gumbo may include advertising, market research, media planning, public relations, product pricing, distribution, customer support, sales strategy, and community involvement.

Marketing involves getting the word out concerning your business. It’s the process of developing strategies such as ad placement, frequency, etc. Advertising includes the placement of an ad in such mediums as newspapers, direct mail, billboards, television, radio, and of course the Internet. Advertising is the largest expense of most marketing plans, with public relations following in a close second and market research not falling far behind.

If your business is lagging on advertising ROI (return on investment), perhaps it’s time to focus more on marketing. Don’t just rely on advertising, get busy MARKETING. A million years ago in high school typing class, we learned to type “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog” – a phrase that uses all the letters of the alphabet. Only by learning and using all the letters on the keyboard could one pass the class.

You’ve got to be quick to succeed in today’s economy. You’ve also got to be smart. Measure your advertising ROI, then integrate a strong marketing mix – research, planning, public relations, pricing, customer support, sales strategy AND community involvement. In other words, learn and use all the letters on the keyboard. Whew, it takes a lot, but the outcome will definitely be worth the effort.

            Tish Pierce, Pierce Creative Marketing Service (www.piercecms.com). She can be contacted at (225) 284-8231 or email info@piercecms.com.

Create Pages That Engage Visitors Quickly

You only have seconds to impress a Visitor to your website.

Average first-time visitors make decisions about a website after only two-tenths of a second, according to Entrepreneur.com. After another 2.6 seconds, they will concentrate enough to reinforce that initial judgment. If a website doesn’t impress readers immediately, it can lose them in the blink of an eye.

Use these strategies to attract and retain readers: Reinforce the site’s main goal Your website can achieve many things, but it should still have one primary goal, whether it’s selling products and services, educating customers, establishing the company’s credentials or generating leads.

Every picture, every bit of text, every link and every button should support the primary goal. If your site’s mission is to capture leads, then each page should include devices to gather visitor information, whether it’s a “Contact Us” call to action or a sign-up form for an e-newsletter.

Keep text short and to the point Remember, you have less than three seconds to capture a visitor’s attention and compel them to explore further. Don’t discourage them with long paragraphs. Use clear, concise text that states what you offer, and make clear what you want the visitor to do – make a purchase, sign up for a demo, subscribe to a newsletter. Make calls to action visible, placing buttons such as “Request a Quote” near the top of the page.

Thinking About Content

8 Steps to Content Curation

As we start 2014, here are some valuable tips and links to get you thinking about managing and improving your content.

Corporate blogging and blog marketing guide

Blogs, short for web logs, are online platforms to create specific types of content, share them and interact with others around those content objects, known as blog posts. They have a number of common features such as comment possibilities, trackbacks and a technology called RSS. The activation of all these characteristics is not a necessity. Business blogs or corporate blogs should focus on non-promotional and regularly updated content entries (posts). – See more at: http://www.contentmarketingexperience.com/

What is the best blogging frequency?

When you start a corporate blog, you create expectations among your target audiences. This also applies to the frequency of your blog posts, along with many other elements. If you have been blogging on a regular basis for a while and then dramatically lower frequency or even stop, it’s hard to create a valuable ongoing and progressive interaction with your target audiences and the communities shaping around your blog and content. Setting these expectations at the beginning is important.  – See more at: http://www.contentmarketingexperience.com/

Content curation: overview, benefits, goals and tools

One of the hot topics in content marketing is content curation. It can play a role in achieving various content marketing – and other – goals, depending on how, where and why you use it.  – See more at: http://www.contentmarketingexperience.com/

Your Social Media Brand Personality

Social Media Icons
Social Media Icons
Social Media Icons

You or your company already has a brand, so it’s important to build a “social media voice” that matches your brand’s personality.

Recommendations

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  • Tell a story.  People will invest in your social media channel if you tell them an interesting story.  What’s important to you?
  • State your values or mission.  What is the focus of your company; what do you do differently than the competition?
  • Match your visual style and brand identity with your social media presence.  Your offline and traditional media channels already have a consistent “look and feel”.  Make sure your social media is using the same colours and type of images.
  • Be aware of your tone of voice.  Different social channels lend themselves to different tones; LinkedIn is more formal than Twitter, for example.

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‘Do It Yourself’ part of your website

I presented a seminar topic on web content to delegates of the annual OAAS convention last Friday. Posted here is a copy of the PowerPoint. (which I will apologize for as it is a little dry).

Content can be the ‘Do It Yourself’ part of your website. Unlike the other aspects where hiring a professional is recommended, content is very DIY, and therefore less costly than other forms of website development. The real cost of content is the time you have to put into it to be successful.

Over the next few days I’ll answer some of the questions which were asked at the seminar. Some relate to web content, other questions are simply general web development issues.

  • How much does it cost to have a website built?
  • Where are the cheapest hosts?
  • What is the relationship between images and text?
  • How important is content on the home page?

Blogs Explained – Again

It’s February 25, 2008, some might think it’s too late or redundant to explain what a blog is. The timing couldn’t be better to talk about blogs now. Blogs used to be strictly personal thoughts shared among the web savvy. Today, blogs continue to provide a freedom of expression while at the same time offering something useful for business, a marketing opportunity.

I’ve been blogging for 7 years. Initially I got onboard because of my curiosity. Being in the web industry, I’m continually looking at emerging trends. In February 2002, I posted this message to my douvan.com blog; “What’s a blog? It’s like having a diary but everyone can read it. blogs (aka “web logs”) can be used for all sorts of different things. Some people use them to vent, some use them to communicate to others indirectly. Some use them to let friends know how they’re doing, etc.”

Wikipedia defines blog as:
A blog is a website where entries are commonly displayed in reverse chronological order. “blog” can also be used as a verb, meaning to maintain or add content to a blog.
Many blogs provide commentary or news on a particular subject; others function as more personal online diaries. A typical blog combines text, images, and links to other blogs, web pages, and other media related to its topic. The ability for readers to leave comments in an interactive format is an important part of many blogs. Most blogs are primarily textual, although some focus on art (artlog), photographs (photoblog), sketchblog, videos (vlog), music (MP3 blog), audio (podcasting) are part of a wider network of social media. As of December 2007, blog search engine Technorati was tracking more than 112 million blogs.

So, what is a blog?
A blog is just a Web site driven by a content management system. What makes it so popular? blogging itself made the blog popular. Blogging is publicized by most other media as a legitimate output format. Today’s blog is easy and possible as a result of the applications created by programmers. Blog tools and programs make it possible for anyone to manage content on a Web site.

Who is a blogger?
Even Martha Stewart is blogging. A blogger is a content contributor. Thanks to the blog applications, a blogger can be anyone, HTML skills are not required. As often as possible, the blogger should post content in the form of news, opinions, text and links to her blog space. The title of blogger has in fact become esteemed in the eyes of the public. The blog is recognized as its own media channel like newspaper or radio. Some people are full time paid employees in the position of blogger.

Technology has made it easy for anyone to be a blogger. And anyone can have a blog. Remember, a blog is just a Web site. A blog page on your existing website can help to increase content and provide information in a way your visitors demand.

Create Valuable Content
When the content in your blog is valuable, you create a web environment where visitors can interact with you. Valuable blog content are the words, pictures, audio or video related to your industry. The text found throughout the rest of your site, such as product pages or company history is given from the company perspective. Your industry blog should be written from a personal point of view. Visitors are more likely to identify with the blogger than the head office. The blogger can gain additional trust and credibility by allowing feedback and posting comments.

If you don’t have a blog, get one.
The marketing opportunity is to provide feedback using this social media and increase search engine rankings as a result of the valuable content. A blog will bring more visitors to your Web site and allow your visitors to give their opinions.